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Amazon.com

Here are a few selections you may find interesting. Please support this Web site by ordering through this page. If you are looking for something in particular, please let us know and we'll get it set up for you. Or, if you have a recommendation, we'd love to hear about it. Just send an email to webmaster@womanastronomer.com.


Storms from the Sun
by Michael J. Carlowicz &
Ramon E. Lopez
2002
It's summer time, with lots of sunshine to go around. Want to know more about the star that makes life on Earth possible? 

cover
Hypatia

by Khan Amore
1999, 2001

This 641-page book is in the science fiction genre (my favorite), however, most of it reads like an historical novel. It may not be for everyone and certainly not for the meek. As the author puts it, "If there is anyone that the author has not offended, he hereby offers his sincerest apologies. It was never his intent that anyone should feel left out."
Maria Mitchell : A Life in Journals and Letters
by Henry Albers
2001
I haven't seen a copy of this book yet, however, based on the vast collection of letters and journals left by Maria Mitchell, I would imagine it a very interesting and worthwhile read.
Eclipse: The Celestial Phenomenon That Changed the Course of History
by Duncan Steel
2001
This book contains an account of Maria Mitchell's eclipse chase to Denver, Colorado with her sister and some of her students from Vassar. Besides Maria, this is a great book to read about the history and mystery surrounding one of nature's most intriguing spectacles.
Through the Telescope: A Guide for the Amateur Astronomer, Revised Edition
by Patricia L. Barnes-Svarney, Michael R. Porcellino, 2001
This book is listed here because it has theWoman Astronomer Web site listed (a first!) on page 267, though it is our old address. I've only thumbed through the book and it seems to contain a lot of useful information for the beginning amateur astronomer. The reviews on Amazon.com, however, are less than favorable.
Notable Women in the Physical Sciences
by Benjamin F. Shearer & Barbara Smith Shearer (Editors), 2000
There are 100 women listed and quite a few are women astronomers...even a few I've personally had the pleasure to meet. Amazon.com has 23 sample pages for you to peruse before you buy, including a full index.
Galileo's Daughter : A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love
by Dava Sobel, 1999
A biography on one of astronomy's most distinguished forefathers. Galileo Galilei's life story is told through the surviving letters he received from his oldest illegitimate child, Virginia. She born in 1600 and was placed in a convent at the age of 13 where she took the name Suor Maria Celeste. Her father described her as "a woman of exquisite mind, singular goodness, and most tenderly attached to me."
Contact
by Carl Sagan
1985, 1997
When I first read this book, I really enjoyed the story, though I thought the characters were a little bland. I've since changed my opinion, in large part, because Jodie Foster's excellent performance in the movie version. Get the VHS Contact or the DVD Contact to add to your video library.
Bright Galaxies Dark Matters (Masters of Modern Physics)
by Vera C. Rubin
1996
Here is a collection of essays by one of today's most distinguished woman astronomers. Rubin writes about galaxies, Mount Wilson, and "women's work."
You Can Be a Woman Astronomer
by Andrea Mia Ghez
1995
This is a most charming book by a woman astronomer written for ages 9-12 and shares what it takes to be a woman astronomer. In 1998, a CDROM was added and is offered in combination with the book: You Can Be A Woman Astronomer CDROM & book.
Hypatia of Alexandria (Revealing Antiquity)
Maria Dzielska, F. Lyra (Translator)
1995
This was my main resource when I wrote "Hypatia of Alexandria: a woman before her time" in the premiere issue (Summer 1997) of theWoman Astronomer. It is a fascinating read based, in part, on surviving letters from Hypatia's student Synesius of Cyrene.

 

Updated 01.01.2008
theWoman Astronomer 2001-2008

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